Skip to main content

A Failed Concept by Many: Marbury leads the Pack

So it seems Stephon Marbury cannot keep himself out of controversy.

Marbury stated camp in October that, "he refuses to come off the bench in New York."

In an ironic twist of events. Marbury was granted his wish.

No matter how much Marbury has claimed to become a new man, there seems to be flashes of the old Starbury lingering. Marbury, who has stated that he refuses to accept, "a penny less" than the $21 million he is owed, has been relegated to Jerome James Universe, otherwise known as the inactive list. The Knicks refuse to jeopardize their growth and development for Marbury, who will not be wearing orange and blue after the 2008-09 campaign anyway. With the second highest salary in the NBA, Marbury is untradable, unmovable, and basically stuck. As long as this "stalemate" of a standoff between Marbury and New York Knicks management continues, he will continue to be an issue, and a dark cloud (with a Starbury logo stamped in ofcourse) over the Knicks organization, its season, and its new era.

With the Knicks eleven games into the season, the Marbury issue has begun to lose life. And why shouldn't it? There is not anything left to speculate or discuss until a major move occurs. Buyout or trade. With that said, a statement from another NBA player regarding Marbury's issue has sparked another issue. In a previous column written before the season started (Star(bury) Crossed Career: Now or Never for Stephon), yours truly touched on this year being a make or break year for Stephon's career.

So far, Marbury's year seems to be a driving force into the final nail of his coffin for his career and image.

Marbury, who seems to value the $21 million more than his own legacy (not the one he has created in his own mind), has not budged on negotiations for a buyout. He wants all of his money and he wants to be let go. He wants his cake, and wants to eat it as well. Unfortunately, for such a savvy businessman as Stephon Marbury, he doesn't understand the value and importance of this year.

Which brings the story to the comments made by Sam Cassell of the Boston Celtics. Sam Cassell stated:
They should let him go. They always tell us to be professional. Be Professional about it. Let the man go. Why not? I've known steph for years. I said a long time ago that he was special. That he's still going through all of this; its crazy. Let him go.
Now there are a lot of baggage that comes with that statement. I understand the loyalty to the NBA Players Association. And I understand the bond to the fraternity as players. However, for Cassell to request that the New York Knicks give Marbury $21 million to go play somewhere else without any sort of compromise is ludicrous.

Cassell, who last year signed an agreement with the Los Angeles Clippers wanted out, and was highly interested in signing with the Boston Celtics. He requested a buyout with the Clippers. Despite the shady character decision of wanting out of his deal to sign with a better team mid-season, Cassell agreed to forgo half of his salary to be let out of his contract. Cassell understands the process of a buyout. You give something, to get something.

Stephon Marbury has failed to grasp this concept.

The same way he has failed to grasp the concept of him embarrassing the Knick organization through his countless escapades of trials, empty promises, outlandish comments, team hiatus' and running off various coaches.

In a rare situation, the owner, and management have created a new way for leverage in negotiation and business. And suddenly, the players are crying about it.

Mark Cuban and the Dallas Mavericks have followed suit in the Stephon Marbury situation by benching and rendering Jerry Stackhouse inactive, another talented, but overly verbally aggressive character.

Is it morally correct? No. But neither the way some athletes have signed rich and incentive laden deals, yet still carry themselves like they deserve, have the right to, or the world owes them.

Stephon Marbury and Jerry Stackhouse are both very talented players in the NBA. But somehow, most fans will never see the day when a Tim Duncan is told to "just sit out." And there is a clear and concise reason for a situation such as that never occurring with Duncan. Sam Cassell in essence was correct. Be Professional. However, he should have added, not only when it is beneficial to you, but at all times.

Another concept Stephon Marbury has failed to grasp.

It's dissapointing for Stephon Marbury to be linked with the greatness of Oscar Robertson statistically, yet be worlds away in the way fans see them both. Marbury could play next year for another team, in another city, and go on to do great things, even win a title. However, as stated in that article in May, "Marbury's antics as a Knick have cost him his career, and that can be solidified this upcoming season. Mark my words - this is Stephon Marbury's last chance."

And it is. Yet, Marbury is more concerned with not accepting "a penny less" than $21 million.

Just another failed concept for Marbury.

Recent Favorites

Turning 39 - One Last Go-Around in My 30s

I turn 39 today, and everything I read in regards to such a "milestone" is that it's dealing with the anxiety of turning 40. The big 4-0!  Yet, I sit here punching the keys completely unaware of fears, trepidations, and emotions towards the future. Instead, I find myself immersed in the present - in exactly that, 39. I also find myself slightly looking back on the road to get here - my final year in my 30s.  I look back on my thoughts on turning 30 ( Praying on a Cool Thirty ) and, ironically, I very much vibe and can feel the essence of where I was at the time. At the time, turning thirty meant a whoooooooooooole sort of different expectations and responsibilities. I am in that same place - a center of gratitude for the journey. My 30s have been a ride.  For me, I became a father, and I lost my father. I lost one of my best friends, yet, I gained another in my son - and then a second one just recently. I finished coursework on my second Masters degree, and I also watch

Quick Ponder: Health, Happiness, and Tina Turner

Moving into  this phase of  health, my family's happiness,  and that Tina Turner "Proud Mary" transition-dancing kind of joy.

Trump Conviction: Hard to Describe This Time in History

You just have to shake your head at the reality of the situation.  A former President of the United States was just convicted - on several counts - of a crime.  It's the kind of thing, even in a post-Trump Presidency, where even strange things seem normalized, going too far is desensitized, and you ultimately laugh hysterically at the uber strangeness to suppress the sadness, that even this - THIS! - is still attention-grabbing.  It's no secret if you follow this site - I'm no Trump supporter. I understand why voters elected him in 2016 and struggle to understand why so many stay with him through it all for a 2024 campaign.  We've reach a new level where American voters will outright neglect crimes, and vote to elect a convicted felon as President of the United States. It's quite hard to describe this time in history.  Yet, here we are.  Several other quick thoughts:  I still wonder whether Trump wins or loses, how does the Republican party move on after Trump? I do