Skip to main content

Alive, Well, & Healthy: The Survival, Recovery, and Future of MLB

Major League Baseball has seen an increase in Black participation for the first time since 1995. According to the Associate Press, black players accounted for 10.2 percent of Major League Baseball players, up from a dwindling 8.2 percent in 2007. The percentage of black pitchers also increased from 3 to 5 percent, as well as black infielders, from 7 to 9 percent.

Major League also received other positive news, grades, and stats regarding diversity, and their game:

Five minority General Managers.

Increased of minority employees in commissioners officer from 28 to 34 percent.

Overall, received a B for gender hiring, and an overall grade of B+ for diversity. Up from the B- in 2008. 

With the celebration of Jackie Robinson, his life, and his accomplishments last week, baseball is prepared to move forward for the future. And with the growth of diversity throughout the game, that movement is poised for a lengthy and successful run due to several key elements coming together for the game.

The first element that was immediately fixed, was the marketing of the teams, and players. Major League Baseball has been criticized for the past decade for how it handles the images of its players. In the past three or four years, MLB has begun focusing on promoting its stars, especially its stars of color. It also worked out that players such as Jimmy Rollins, Albert Pujols, and Ryan Howard have played on the game's biggest stage along with rising stars in BJ Upton, Carl Crawford, and David Price.

The second key element is the modernization of the game. In the age of iPhones, flat screens, and various technology, our society demands a certain pace that if not met, causes you to become outdated. For a game so rich in tradition, history and lure, baseball struggled to find its niche in preserving history, while moving forward and keeping the game fresh. It is what the National Football League does so well which makes it king. However, with the addition of a two tiered playoff system, parity throughout the league, instant replay, brand new stadiums, television coverage of the draft, growing coverage of the NCAA College World Series, and a more entertaining product, baseball has indeed reinvented itself. When Commissioner "Bud" Selig says, "The game has never been more healthy", he is indeed telling the truth.

Finally, the last key element that has come together for MLB is the addition of the World Baseball Classic. Despite it's critics here in the United States, the WBC has done wonders worldwide in expanding the game, and exposing the greatest talent on earth. It gives the game an international dimension that not even the mighty NFL can boast about.

Baseball has come a long way from the strike of 1994. It has gone through it's trials and tribulations with performance enhancing drugs, narcotics, irresponsible financial decisions, declining minority participation, grand jury testimonies, and fallen heroes. Yet, it has rebounded, recovered, and reshaped it's direction, and the future of the sport. 


The final element for MLB would be a key figure along the likes of Tiger and Lebron, but that remains to be seen, and that pedestal remains void.

Nonetheless, the sport is on its way. After surviving, and recovering, through modernization and diversity, MLB is alive, well, and healthy. And it's future looks bright. Really, bright.

Recent Favorites

Turning 39 - One Last Go-Around in My 30s

I turn 39 today, and everything I read in regards to such a "milestone" is that it's dealing with the anxiety of turning 40. The big 4-0!  Yet, I sit here punching the keys completely unaware of fears, trepidations, and emotions towards the future. Instead, I find myself immersed in the present - in exactly that, 39. I also find myself slightly looking back on the road to get here - my final year in my 30s.  I look back on my thoughts on turning 30 ( Praying on a Cool Thirty ) and, ironically, I very much vibe and can feel the essence of where I was at the time. At the time, turning thirty meant a whoooooooooooole sort of different expectations and responsibilities. I am in that same place - a center of gratitude for the journey. My 30s have been a ride.  For me, I became a father, and I lost my father. I lost one of my best friends, yet, I gained another in my son - and then a second one just recently. I finished coursework on my second Masters degree, and I also watch

Quick Ponder: Health, Happiness, and Tina Turner

Moving into  this phase of  health, my family's happiness,  and that Tina Turner "Proud Mary" transition-dancing kind of joy.

Trump Conviction: Hard to Describe This Time in History

You just have to shake your head at the reality of the situation.  A former President of the United States was just convicted - on several counts - of a crime.  It's the kind of thing, even in a post-Trump Presidency, where even strange things seem normalized, going too far is desensitized, and you ultimately laugh hysterically at the uber strangeness to suppress the sadness, that even this - THIS! - is still attention-grabbing.  It's no secret if you follow this site - I'm no Trump supporter. I understand why voters elected him in 2016 and struggle to understand why so many stay with him through it all for a 2024 campaign.  We've reach a new level where American voters will outright neglect crimes, and vote to elect a convicted felon as President of the United States. It's quite hard to describe this time in history.  Yet, here we are.  Several other quick thoughts:  I still wonder whether Trump wins or loses, how does the Republican party move on after Trump? I do