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Sunday Sunday Rundown - 4/12/20


3 Up

1. Happy Easter - He is risen! Easter surely doesn't feel as joyous and as traditional as it always does - missing church services, egg hunts, and family dinners - but the message is still there - God is God. Even in this broken world right now, turning to faith provides a sense of security - a sense of sense.

2. Essential Workers - Let's give some love to the many people who are keeping communities together. Yes, medical professionals are other Super Hero-like right now. That will never be forgotten. However, there are so many heroes - food service workers, gas stations, pharmacists, etc... - who are keeping it running, saving lives, and yes, risking their to make it happen.

3. New Yorkers - I may be biased because I live here in the greatest city in the world, which has been brought to its knees from COVID-19. However, a serious sense of appreciation for the real New Yorkers who live in this city, and haven't left - whether by socioeconomics or even out of love. This is our home. Much love to the real New Yorkers who continue on...

3 Down

1. Bodies Buried in the Bronx - This absolutely broke my heart this week. The image of unclaimed bodies that succumbed to the coronavirus is tough to take. Just so, so, so heartbreaking.

2. Virus Effects on Black and Brown Communities - There is so much to jump into here. Because quite frankly, many of the jobs being mentioned above in the "Up" are held by lower-income individuals, who are usually black and brown individuals. They CANNOT afford to NOT go to work. They are out there, without protection, without insurance, and once again, within an unequal system.

2. Leilani Jordan - This story broke my heart. A grocery store clerk who suffered from cerebral palsy continued to work to help her community despite her compromised immune system. She did what she could until the very end.

1 Interesting Tweet

1. Clint Smith - I had the pleasure of meeting Clint Smith a few years ago at a work conference. He is one of the most intelligent people I have ever met, especially on the topic of diversity, inclusion, history, and social justice. His recent comments on the rising connection of the coronavirus and black and brown people, especially lower-income people, is very, very salient.



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