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What Happened to Human Decency?

Often in suicide cases, I have no sympathy and empathy for any person that decides to take their life. No matter how hard life becomes, ending your own life is for lack of a better phrase, a cop out.

However, when it comes to the tragic story of Tyler Clementi, a part of me has sympathy for the victimized young man. Not because his life was ended, but because he was a victim of a growing epidemic in this country.

In fact, the story is one that emits sadness as well as an awareness to examine how truly heartless, inconsiderate, and selfless our society has become. Clementi, obviously ashamed after not only his sexual encounter with another man was revealed on the internet, but the identity of his sexuality, decided to end what many friends and family described as a talented and bright future.

This was a life that was baited into being cut short. Suicidal thoughts that were forced into his mental well-being by two individuals who found the humiliation of another person to be simply, humorous.

No matter the choice of Clementi’s sexual preference, the mere invasion of someone’s privacy along with a willingness to publicly humiliate them in their most intimate and private moments is despicable. Nothing short of of a scumbag move. Maybe even beyond that.

And while the family, friends, and acquaintances of Dharun Ravi and Molly Wei describe them as “good” people, nothing about their decision to publicly humiliate another person reflects that description.

This has nothing to do with Technology or “cyber bullying.” Technology doesn’t kill anymore people that guns do. We control computers. We control guns.

And no, this has nothing to do with bias or discrimination towards homosexuals. This is not about gay rights, hate crimes, acceptance, or anything related to the gay and lesbian community.

This is about human courtesy and human decency - a dying component of our generation and society.

A concept that is not about being a “good” or “bad”, but having respect for the basic human rights for all of mankind.

Ravi and Mei didn’t think that was important. In an age where encouraged self-centered behavior continues to grow, Ravi and Mei conformed to the world’s direction. What was important was being cool, humorous, and well known in their tweets and videos about their discovery. Ultimately, they wanted to be the center of everyone’s attention.

Well, they sure have it now.

Hopefully, living with this on their conscious for the rest of their lives was well worth the notoriety, and the laugh.

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