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Remembering Nelson Mandela


I learned about him at the early age of five from my mother who I could tell at the time, really held him in high regards. At that age, it was evident that he was a very important man, and what he stood for was just as important. 

As I got older, six, seven, eight, nine, I came to understand the meaning of apartheid from my mother and from my grade school teachers, who also found it important to explain to us what was going on in South Africa. I remember thinking this was terrible. I remember gravitating to this cause the way I found myself completely engulfed in learning any and everything about the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 

Obviously, as I got older and furthered research on my own, I came to learn about the beauty of Nelson Mandela. His leadership in unifying a nation after almost forty years of apartheid-rule, his perseverance through being unjustly jailed for twenty-seven years, and of course, his unbelievable forgiveness to those who favored apartheid, to those that jailed him, and to those that have had hatred towards him for his unifying, loving, inspirational, and transcending characteristics.

Words can't describe what Nelson Mandela has not only done for South Africa, or the entire world, but for humanity as well. The world loss a good one today. 

Despite his passing, we should all continue to hold the teachings and quotes from Mr. Mandella as pillars in our lives. Not just during the time of his passing, but throughout our lives. For as he stated in one of his memorable quotes, "...love comes more naturally from the human heart than it's opposite."

Here are some other favorite quotes from the great Nelson Mandela:

"No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite."

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world."

"For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others."

"I hate race discrimination most intensely and in all its manifestations. I have fought it all during my life; I fight it now, and will do so until the end of my days."

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world."

"Lead from the back — and let others believe they are in front."

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